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nevver:

Morimura Ray

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bothsidesguys:

KREUZBERG APT, BERLIN

fantasticfrank.de

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proofmathisbeautiful:

zerostatereflex:

Water Experiment No. 33 Automata

What a beautiful work of craftsmanship.

By: Dean O’Callaghan

Can’t look away…

(Source: mittlillahus, via sweethomestyle)

You don’t fool me, Effy Stonem.

(Source: bluemavor, via -everdeen)

Ser Bronn of The Blackwater. Anointed by the king himself.

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theclotheshorse:

Nga of  The Honey Fashion Bunny

theclotheshorse:

Nga of The Honey Fashion Bunny

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thejunglenook:


Illustrator’s work invaluable to scientists and conservationistsBy Daniel Dunaief
Stephen Nash’s world is populated by the bushiness of eyebrows, the length of tails, and the exact color of skin or fur. An award-winning illustrator, Nash has spent over 30 years at Stony Brook, where he has honed his craft of creating artistic renderings of gibbons, monkeys, apes, gorillas, and numerous others.British-born and trained, Nash, who is a visiting research associate in the Department of Anatomical Sciences at Stony Brook, came to Long Island in 1982 at the request of Russell Mittermeier, the president of Conservation International. The combination has become a force in conservation, raising awareness of, and potential threats to, numerous primates, as well as other species, such as tree kangaroos in Papua, New Guinea and baobab trees in Madagascar.Nash provided illustrations, compiled over the course of his career, for a book published last spring called “Mammals of the World: Primates.” At 10.5 pounds, the hard-cover book, which Mittermeier and others edited, is equal to the weight of about 67 mouse lemurs.
Animals are often not cooperative when it comes to posing for pictures, especially when a scientist would like to take a photo that reflects something unique about its physical appearance.
Illustrators like Nash, whose wife Lucille Betti-Nash shares the same profession and works at Stony Brook, use a combination of photos and videos, descriptions from available literature and discussions with current scientists to create images that most closely resemble animals that sometimes rely on staying away from human, and other mammalian, eyes to survive. (continue reading)

It should be noted that he also created the Nash Collection of Primates in Art and Illustration. An amazing resource which you all should check out.

thejunglenook:

Illustrator’s work invaluable to scientists and conservationists
By Daniel Dunaief

Stephen Nash’s world is populated by the bushiness of eyebrows, the length of tails, and the exact color of skin or fur. An award-winning illustrator, Nash has spent over 30 years at Stony Brook, where he has honed his craft of creating artistic renderings of gibbons, monkeys, apes, gorillas, and numerous others.

British-born and trained, Nash, who is a visiting research associate in the Department of Anatomical Sciences at Stony Brook, came to Long Island in 1982 at the request of Russell Mittermeier, the president of Conservation International. The combination has become a force in conservation, raising awareness of, and potential threats to, numerous primates, as well as other species, such as tree kangaroos in Papua, New Guinea and baobab trees in Madagascar.

Nash provided illustrations, compiled over the course of his career, for a book published last spring called “Mammals of the World: Primates.” At 10.5 pounds, the hard-cover book, which Mittermeier and others edited, is equal to the weight of about 67 mouse lemurs.

Animals are often not cooperative when it comes to posing for pictures, especially when a scientist would like to take a photo that reflects something unique about its physical appearance.

Illustrators like Nash, whose wife Lucille Betti-Nash shares the same profession and works at Stony Brook, use a combination of photos and videos, descriptions from available literature and discussions with current scientists to create images that most closely resemble animals that sometimes rely on staying away from human, and other mammalian, eyes to survive. (continue reading)

It should be noted that he also created the Nash Collection of Primates in Art and Illustration. An amazing resource which you all should check out.

(via scientificillustration)

theclotheshorse:

Jane of Sea of Shoes

theclotheshorse:

Jane of Sea of Shoes